Informations techniques

Page 2 sur 2 Précédent  1, 2

Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Informations techniques

Message par Gillou91 le Mer 31 Jan - 1:05:40

Rappel du premier message :

Comme je suis abonné à leurs lettres d'informations, je partage avec vous ces infos qui, pour certaines sont intéressantes, du style "comment éviter les conséquences de certains défauts sur nos moteurs"...

Bon, c'est en anglais, mais les traducteurs du net feront assez bien la "translation"  clin
Bonne lecture  clin  

 







The M96 engine was first introduced with the 1997 Porsche Boxster and featured many innovations which allowed Porsche to provide an exceptional balance between performance and price. 






The M96 platform was used successfully through the 2008 model year and was featured in all Boxster, Cayman, and 911 models, with exception of the GT3, Turbo, and GT2.

The 986 and 996 and later 987 and 997 vehicles are a great value and even better vehicles. Taking care of your investment and performing preventative maintenance is key to the longevity of the M96 and M97 Engine. If and when an engine failure occurs, RND Engines offers rebuilt engines addressing the key trouble areas of the M96 and M97 engine, but even then, proper maintenance is required.

To better understand these engines and the RND Engine Program, it's best to educate yourself about these engines with the goal of preventing engine failures and their costly consequences.





The Intermediate Shaft Bearing Issues.





With the great success of the Boxster launch came a few shortcomings of this platform. Most notably, the IMS issues were a stain on Porsche's image once it came to the media's attention with the class action lawsuit for these failures. With the introduction of the M97 engine, the IMS was redesigned with a new, larger bearing that thankfully has proven to be very reliable with one easy modification. Regardless of which IMS bearing you have, there are steps that must be taken before you have a failure to prevent catastrophic engine failure.





There were three versions of the IMS offered and detailed in IMS 101:





1997-1999: Boxster and 911 received a dual row bearing. The early dual row bearing has a long service life and it's common to see these bearings go 100,000 miles or more without issue.





2000-2001: Boxster and 911 could have received either the early dual row or newer single row bearing. In these two years, Porsche used both the more durable dual row bearing and smaller, single row that is prone to failure. As it is impossible to tell which bearing you have without pulling the transmission first, it's a toss up which bearing you have and how much risk there is involved in not changing out the IMS bearing.




2002-2005: Boxster and 911 received a single row bearing. These model years are most prone to sudden and catastrophic failure, so replacement of the ims bearing is highly recommended.





2006-2008: Boxster, Cayman, and 911 received a larger single row bearing (non-serviceable). This final version is the most reliable of the factory bearings and replacement is not necessary.



All three versions were sealed conventional ball bearings. Had the original bearing been an open bearing, it is common belief that the added lubrication from submersion of the IMS in oil would have prolonged the life of the bearing or eliminated IMS failures entirely.





To further complicate identifying what IMS your engine might have, replacement new or remanufactured engines would have received whatever bearing was currently being used in production. So it is possible to have a 2.5 Boxster engine, built in 2006, with the later non-serviceable ims bearing. However, it's easy to identify if your engine is not original. If there is an X or Y in the engine serial number, it's been replaced, and a dealership may be able to tell you when it was manufactured.





Porsche has never offered a replacement IMS bearing nor supplied tools or a specified service interval for changing the IMS bearing. For most vehicles, servicing the IMS bearing involves 10-14 hours of labor and a handful of parts. Typically when changing the IMS bearing, it's best to install a new water pump, low temperature thermostat, clutch and dual mass flywheel, RMS, and an AOS, as well as address any other issues such as the Variocam wear pads on 1997-2002 Boxster and 1999-2001 911 engines. Servicing a Tiptronic car is no different and IMS problems are just as common with these models.









[size=19]Thankfully, there are many choices for IMS bearings.


RND uses in its remanufactured engines either an LN Engineering Single Row Pro or Classic Dual Row IMS Retrofit, both of which feature dual row ceramic hybrid IMS bearings that are rated for a 6 year or 75,000 mile service interval.

Learn more about IMS Retrofit
[/size]






[size=19][size=13]For those wanting to utilize a roller bearing alternatively or on a budget, RND also employs a roller bearing kit that features true thrust control and expanded load range (using additional rollers over normal bearings this size) which has a recommended service interval of 4 years or 48,000 miles.



Learn more about RND RS Roller Bearing kits
[/size][/size]






[size=19][size=13]Lastly, the 
IMS Solution backdates the M96 engine to an oil fed plain bearing that has no service interval and is the only permanent fix to the IMS problem with no moving parts to fail.



Learn more about IMS Solution
[/size][/size]


Both the LN IMS Retrofit and RND Roller Kit use bearings without grease seals. The M96 and M97 engine are wet sump, meaning the engine oil is stored in the bottom of the engine, submerging the intermediate shaft and providing substantial lubrication to the IMS bearing at all times. Forced oiling is not required for these bearing types when an open-bearing (unsealed) is employed.






However, the IMS alone is not the sole cause of problems with the M96 and its later M97 iterations - leaky rear main seals, cracked or scored cylinders, failing water pumps and cracked heads, air oil separator failures, and oil starvation issues all plague the M96 and M97 Engine. Thankfully, many of these issues, including the IMS, can be minimized or prevented.







[size=13]First and foremost, changing your oil every 6 months or 5,000 miles is highly recommended using an A40 approved 5w40 full synthetic oil rather than the factory 0w40. Other performance lubricants are available for street and track from Motul, Driven, and Millers among others, so there are many choices available to ensure proper lubrication.

Most independents recommend changing the water pump with a genuine Porsche water pump every 3-4 years or at most 50,000 miles to prevent cracked cylinder heads, which are common after water pump failure as the impeller pieces get lodged in small coolant passages in the heads, requiring cylinder head replacement to correct the resulting intermix (water and coolant mix).


High operating temperatures, both coolant and oil, shorten the life of engine components. Along with ensuring your radiators are clean of debris and back-flushed at least once yearly (requires removing the front bumper cover), adding an LN Engineering 160F low temperature thermostat  helps the cooling system regulate temperature changes better and allow for overall cooler operation year-round with no emissions or hvac issues.

For those who take their car auto-crossing or to the track, oiling issues are prone to the M96 and M97 engine. Many do not know that this engine is not dry sump like its predecessors. Combined with high oil temperatures and inadequate scavenging of oil from the heads, high G forces pull oil away from the oil pickup and result in aeration and loss of oil pressure. Use of a boutique 5w40 synthetic or race oil can help with this problem, but adding an LN Engineering 2 quart deep sump in addition to improved baffling of the wet sump almost eliminates these issues.

The rear main seal is an issue that can be checked for with a specialty tool coupled with installation of the newest genuine Porsche PTFE rear main seal and should be replaced every time the clutch or IMS is serviced.

The AOS, which stands for air-oil separator, applies a vacuum to the engine internals, helping with ring seal and controlling blow-by. When an AOS fails, the vacuum ends up sucking oil mist into the intake, resulting in copious amounts of white smoke out the tail pipe. Many an AOS failure has been misdiagnosed as a simple AOS failure, which is easily correctible with installation of a new genuine Porsche AOS and cleaning of the intake manifold.
[/size]





Last but not least, the cylinder issues that plague the M96 and M96 engine are a big issue.


The two most important things to do to minimized these problems is change your oil and install a low temperature thermostat as recommended above. There are three main modes of failure for cylinders:
[list="margin: 1.33em 0px 1.33em 40px; padding-right: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: normal; width: auto; height: auto; float: none;"]
[*]Scored cylinder. Scored cylinders are the most common in the 2002 and later 3.6 and 3.8 engines and to a lesser extent with the 987 3.4 S engines that are fitted with factory forged pistons.
[*]Cracked (D-chunk). Most common to 996 3.4 engines but can occur to any 1997-2008 M96 and M967 engine.
[*]Slipped sleeve. Limited to engines built in or around 1998 and 1999 where the factory had the blocks sleeved to correct a casting issue and is most common to the 2.5 Boxster engine.
[/list]
The process RND Engines uses features LN Engineering Nickies cylinders which have been offered for over a decade and is the proven solution to all cylinder related issues providing superior cooling, strength, and longevity with an aluminum cylinder that is optimal.










RND Engines are sold by SSF Auto Parts through a network of professional independent specialists nationwide and are backed with a 1 yr, 12,000 mile warranty offered by SSF Auto Parts, which has been the leader in the industry since 1976. 





RND Engines is the result of a cooperation between the industry's leading European repair specialists and leading European parts supplier, SSF. This combined knowledge and expertise in engineering, rebuilding, and parts distribution is what sets RND Engines apart in the aftermarket. The mission of RND Engines is to supply the aftermarket the most updated, reliable, and absolute highest quality M96/97 exchange engines at a fair price. RND Engines are built for the car owner passionate about their vehicle, and an owner that wants to keep their vehicle operating at the highest standards. With no corners cut or details overlooked, RND engines simply offer a high-quality alternative and ultimate peace of mind.





please visit  





[size=13]http://www.LNengineering.com
125 Gladiolus St. | PO Box 401 | Momence, IL 60954 | Phone (815) 472-2939 Fax (413) 280-9041
[/size]


Dernière édition par Gillou91 le Jeu 1 Fév - 13:16:09, édité 1 fois
avatar
Gillou91
Le disciple du Sage
Le disciple du Sage

Age : 61

Revenir en haut Aller en bas


GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par Gillou91 le Jeu 8 Fév - 0:14:12

Un p'tit up sur certains carburants, pas trop conseillés sur de longues périodes sur nos anciennes....

Any information you may receive related to this commentary is provided merely as friendly suggestions, not as expert opinion, testimony or advice. 
Everyone with a classic car understands the need for high zinc oils, but what about fuels. With the advent of modern E10 fuels and E15 fuels just around the corner, what are owners with older vehicles made before 2007 have fuel systems not rated for use with E15 (15% ethanol) fuels.

Vehicles manufactured in or after 2006 should be compatible with E10 fuels according to numerous sources, but what makes these fuel systems compatible with E10? Modern fuel systems have PTFE lined fuel hoses capable of resisting degradation caused by ethanol fuels, but older vehicles do not. Ethanol is hygroscopic, meaning it absorbs water. We all know what water in the fuel system is not good and can lead to damage to paper filters, water contamination, and fuel phase separation. Ethanol is also very corrosive and will promote rusting where air meets metal once exposed to ethanol fuels. Ethanol is also a solvent and will cause deterioration of rubber, plastics, and fiberglass that are not rated for use with ethanol fuels. Lastly, ethanol enriched fuels have much shorter shelf lives than non-ethanol fuels.
If your car is older than 2006, you may need to take additional steps to protect your engine and fuel system from the effects of ethanol fuels. 
Regardless of choice of E10 or ethanol-free fuels, choosing a Top Tier(TM) detergent gasoline is very important. This standard, developed in 2004, ensures the fuel you receive from brand to brand and station to station meets the stringent requirements to qualify as a Top Tier fuel. Lower detergent and additive levels found in non-Top Tier(TM) fuels can have adverse affects on injector, valve, and chamber deposits that can cause drivability issues leading to engine damage and costly repairs.


Next time you go to put gas and see the station is accepting a fuel delivery, just keep driving by. It is a good practice not to pump when stations are receiving a fuel delivery, as contaminants can be stirred up and even though the fuel is filtered at the pump, why risk getting contaminated fuel?


Although uncommon, some gas stations offer ethanol free fuels. There are websites and apps for your phone that will help you find ethanol-free fuel suppliers.
For lack of ethanol free or race fuels, some hot-rodders have taken to using aviation fuels, known more commonly as AV gas - please don't.
These fuels have a lower density than automotive fuels and will make your car run leaner. Additives in 100LL AV gas will also cause damage to oxygen sensors and catalytic converters, so these fuels might cause more harm than good. 
Once you have chosen the right fuel another consideration are fuel additives..

Normally we are not for additives, but in this case, additional steps are required to ensure that older fuel systems are protected and that newer fuel systems are kept at peak performance. Even modern fuel systems can suffer from poor fuel quality and aging components. Regular use of Top Tier(TM) fuels extended component life and cleanliness, but additional steps can be taken to further improve the situation.

In most places, premium fuels are minimum 91 octane (AKI or R+M/2 measurement method) and some locations in the United States and Canada have access to 92, 93, or even 94 octane pump premium fuels. Most race tracks have 100 octane unleaded and even higher octane leaded fuels. AKI ratings are on average 4-6 points lower than RON or MON measurement method used worldwide.

First and foremost, never use leaded fuel in a fuel injected engine with oxygen sensors. Lead will foul oxygen sensors in as little as one tank of fuel and can lead to engine damage. Leaded fuel also contaminates the engine oil, increasing wear, so stay away from leaded fuel unless required by the engine. Older engines without hardened valve seats requiring leaded fuels (pre 1970s) can use lead substitute additives to prevent seat damage. Redline's Lead Substitute(TM) uses sodium as the dissimilar metal to protect unhardened valves seats.

Most modern engines with knock-sensing are designed to take advantage of modern, higher octane fuels, increasing performance and efficiency by allowing for advanced timing to make the most of the higher octane fuel, but what is octane? The octane rating is basically a number that relates to the fuels resistance to combustion or to fight pre-ignition and detonation. In a perfect world, to maximize performance, you want to use the lowest octane required to prevent pre-ignition and detonation. Likewise, a high-performance engine or one upgraded with higher compression pistons requires premium high-octane fuel to prevent knock. The side effect is the engine makes more power. So, unless you engine requires or has modern engine management to take advantage of higher octane fuel, use of higher octane fuels is a waste of money. It's best to refer to your engine builder's recommendations or if your car is stock, the octane requirements stated by the manufacturer, to ensure you use the right fuel.

If you need higher octane fuel but it is not available to you, beware of octane boosters claiming boosting levels by X points - for example, a 5 point increase would actually increase 91 octane to 91.5 octane unless the manufacturer provides a table to calculate actual octane, as is commonly done with race gas concentrates like that sold by Torco Race Fuels™ or additives like Driven Injector Defender with Octane Booster.
Lastly, when it comes to older vehicles and fuel systems not designed for E10 ethanol fuels, use of additives to prevent damage is a must. For cars driven regularly, as defined by a tank of fuel used in 30 days or less, adding Driven Carb  or Injector Defender(TM) will protect against damage caused by ethanol enriched fuels, and is based on the additives used in South America where E85 and E100 fuels are the norm. For vehicles that are going to be stored, use of a product such as  Driven Storage Defender(TM) provides added fuel system corrosion protection and should be added to a full tank of fuel to help minimize the accumulation of moisture in the fuel tank and corrosion. Be sure to run the car after adding these additives to ensure the entire fuel system is protected. 
In summary, what steps can be taken?

  • Update fuel lines and filters to mutli-fuel compatible type - lines and filters rated for E85 fuels will perform very well and provide excellent life with E10 fuels. 
  • Replace seals and gaskets with modern materials that are compatible with ethanol fuels.
  • Add a water separator to the fuel system.
  • Have older fuel tanks professionally cleaned and sealed to prevent corrosion.
  • Replace mechanical fuel pumps with modern electric fuel pumps compatible with ethanol fuels.
  • Use ethanol-free fuels.
  • Always use premium high octane fuels if your vehicle can benefit from them.
  • Use ethanol fuel additives to protect older fuel systems or those vehicles in storage with every fill up.
  • Use concentrated fuel system cleaner like Liqui Moly Jectron #2007 (TM) at least every oil change.


Gillou91
Le disciple du Sage
Le disciple du Sage


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par Max93 le Jeu 8 Fév - 4:47:00

toujours tres bien detailler tes réponse mon Gillou.
merci jocolor

Max93
VIP
VIP


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par mataïva66 le Jeu 8 Fév - 9:44:25

It's possible avoir résumé traduction in Francès...???  Smile Book Cool

mataïva66
Le disciple du Sage
Le disciple du Sage


http://996 / 3.6 / 2003 / gris kerguelen

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par Gillou91 le Jeu 8 Fév - 14:55:52

Merci Max! clin


Claude, pour faire simple, évite de mettre du E10 (sauf cas exceptionnel).... Toute la tripaille mécanique/élastomères n'a pas été prévue pour ce carburant !!!

Gillou91
Le disciple du Sage
Le disciple du Sage


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par mataïva66 le Jeu 8 Fév - 15:13:40

Pas de problème, j'avais un peu compris même si pas trop bon en Anglais.

Sinon à part la camionnette, le tracteur et la voiture de Mme qui tournent au mazout... Very Happy
la grenouille et la moto carburent au SP98 !

mataïva66
Le disciple du Sage
Le disciple du Sage


http://996 / 3.6 / 2003 / gris kerguelen

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par cigale13 le Jeu 8 Fév - 20:23:17

Rien à voir, mais mon voisin a mis du 95E10 dans sa tronçonneuse, résultat... serrage piston cylindre..

cigale13
Le cercle des Porschistes
Le cercle des Porschistes


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par Ratagaz le Jeu 8 Fév - 21:05:40

Salut,

c'est de l'info et chacun en fait ce qu'il veut !

On y croit ou pas, on a essayé et oui ou non c'est mieux , peut être, pas du tout voir l'effet "placebo"

Mais de temps en temps, y'en a un qui sort du lot Smile 

Nos grenouille ne supportent pas autre chose que le SP98 minimum, donc le reste c'est en "dépannage"

Sauf le RON104 appelé "avgaz" que l'on trouve sur les aérodrome et distribution marine (c'est pas le même prix mais c'est bluffant a essayer ;)

+1 pour le MICROLON

NB: Pour les mazout, il faut mettre 0.2% d'huile 2 temps   angel ça protège, ça pollue moins et...ça consomme moins. Et la gas-oil "excelium" d'une certaine marque est a déconseille au dessus de 2 utilisations par an.

Ratagaz
10 000 tr/mn !!!!!!
10 000 tr/mn !!!!!!


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par Taxy68 le Jeu 8 Fév - 22:21:56

[quote="Ratagaz"]Salut,

c'est de l'info et chacun en fait ce qu'il veut !

On y croit ou pas, on a essayé et oui ou non c'est mieux , peut être, pas du tout voir l'effet "placebo"

Mais de temps en temps, y'en a un qui sort du lot [smiley]https://imgfast.net/users/2514/34/10/71/smiles/883942.gif[/smiley] 

Nos grenouille ne supportent pas autre chose que le SP98 minimum, donc le reste c'est en "dépannage"

Sauf le RON104 appelé "avgaz" que l'on trouve sur les aérodrome et distribution marine (c'est pas le même prix mais c'est bluffant a essayer ;)

+1 pour le MICROLON

NB: Pour les mazout, il faut mettre 0.2% d'huile 2 temps   angel ça protège, ça pollue moins et...ça consomme moins. Et la gas-oil "excelium" d'une certaine marque est a déconseille au dessus de 2 utilisations par an.[/quote


Oui mais il me semble que au us, nos grenouilles fonctionnent au sp95.,on en avait déjà parlé dans un autre post.

Et cela depuis tres longtemps.

Envoyé depuis l'appli Topic'it

Taxy68
VIP
VIP


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par GoldenPie le Jeu 8 Fév - 23:27:43

Pour le 95, je ne suis que partiellement d'accord... Il y a des pays où il y a des 996 ou 997, et que du 95 de dispo ! et elles roulent très bien ! le seul hic, c'est que, de ce fait, à l'aide du detecteur de cliquetis, l'avance est modifiée automatiquement à l'aide de la carto pour supporter ce carburant (sauf si l'ecu a été tunnée par le précédant propriétaire et les valeurs de cartos pour supporter du 95 supprimées). Point barre... Certes on doit perdre quelques cv.... et encore... faudrait il que l'on puisse les ressentir !

Après, c'est clair que les 95 d'aujourd'hui sont de plus en plus mélangés avec je ne sais quelles merdes, ethanol à x % et c'est plutot de là que vient le problème je pense.

Bref, c'est clair que dès que tant que peut se faire, rouler au 98 c'est mieux...... après je dis peut être des conneries mais je ne pense pas...
avatar
GoldenPie
VIP 1300
VIP 1300


http://C4 3.6

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par phil74 le Jeu 8 Fév - 23:59:52

+1  GOLDENPIE ....
Tu ne dis pas de conneries....
Les 996 /997 et + ont un rattrapage automatique...
Perdre QQ chevaux sélection naturelle oblige ....
Donc les plus faibles.... Lol
Cool
Tous à 80km/h bien malin qui fera la différence
avatar
phil74
Le disciple du Sage
Le disciple du Sage

Age : 55

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par Gillou91 le Ven 9 Fév - 0:17:11

Louis, l'article ne mentionne que les problèmes avec le E10 ou E15 qui sont additivés à l'éthanol !!!
Bien sûr que le 95 std fonctionne, c'est même ce genre de carburant que l'on trouve majoritairement aux USA... Mon ex venait de là-bas et NO problems with it clin
C'est même mentionné dans le manuel des 96 et 97 !!!!
Le point soulevé est simplement le 95 Éthanol qui est une vrai plaie en cas d'usage répétitif. Perso, il m'est arrivé de fonctionner au E10 sur l'ex et la nouvelle, sans ennuis particuliers. C'est juste qu'il ne faut pas en faire un usage courant, ou alors faire les corrections nécessaires....


Dernière édition par Gillou91 le Ven 9 Fév - 0:49:26, édité 1 fois
avatar
Gillou91
Le disciple du Sage
Le disciple du Sage

Age : 61

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par Ratagaz le Ven 9 Fév - 0:37:01

Quelques mots sur les indices d'octane : il existe deux indices, le RON (indice d'octane "recherche" ) et le MON (indice d'octane "moteur" ). Ces indices caractérisent la résistance au cliquetis du carburant dans des conditions différentes. C'est l'indice RON qui est le plus connu.
En Europe, les spécifications concernent les indices RON et MON. On distingue en général deux types d'essences :
- SP 98 : RON 98 et MON 87
- SP 95 : RON 95 et MON 85

Les Etats-unis par exemple n'utilisent pas les indices d'octane RON comme en Europe, mais ils utilisent un indice AKI calculé à partir des indices MON et RON : (RON+MON)/2. On peut alors trouver les indices AKI suivants 87-89-91, différents de nos 95 et 98 en Europe. Ce sont peut-être de ces indices dont vous parlez.
Ces indices correspondent par exemple aux RON et MON suivants :
- AKI 87 = RON 92 et MON 82
- AKI 89 = RON 94 et MON 84
- AKI 91 = RON 97 et MON 87

Le carburant "regular" est, si ma mémoire ne me fait pas trop défaut l'équivalent du AKI87 donc moins bien que le SP95.

Donc pour les grenouilles US, dans le manuel je suppose qu'il est conseillé d'utiliser de l'AKI 89  voir du 91/93

Regular= AKI87, plus ou Spécial = AKI89, Supreme= AKI91
avatar
Ratagaz
10 000 tr/mn !!!!!!
10 000 tr/mn !!!!!!

Age : 53

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par roda16 le Ven 9 Fév - 8:38:22

@Gillou91 a écrit:Louis, l'article ne mentionne que les problèmes avec le E10 ou E15 qui sont additivés à l'éthanol !!!
Bien sûr que le 95 std fonctionne, c'est même ce genre de carburant que l'on trouve majoritairement aux USA... Mon ex venait de là-bas et NO problems with it clin
C'est même mentionné dans le manuel des 96 et 97 !!!!
Le point soulevé est simplement le 95 Éthanol qui est une vrai plaie en cas d'usage répétitif. Perso, il m'est arrivé de fonctionner au E10 sur l'ex et la nouvelle, sans ennuis particuliers. C'est juste qu'il ne faut pas en faire un usage courant, ou alors faire les corrections nécessaires....
En faisant mon dernier plein j'ai fait l'erreur de mette du 95/ E10, dans ma 997, je n'ai trouvé aucune différence sur le comportement de la voiture, mais comme le dit Gillou le faire régulièrement "pourrait" être nocif ?? Pour info une personne de ma famille roule depuis 5 ans avec un mélange Ethanol 80 %/ SP 20 % et la voiture démarre au quart de tour et se comporte très bien à part la hausse de conso Surprised (Donc vaste débat) le véhicule est un RAV 4 !! Sur un post précédent un de nous devait tester ce carburant sur sa Grenouille je ne me rappelle plus qui ? Cela serait bien qu'il se manifeste pour nous dire ce qu'il pense de son test ?? clin
avatar
roda16
Le cercle des Porschistes
Le cercle des Porschistes

Age : 71

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par Gillou91 le Ven 9 Fév - 10:52:19

Tout à fait Roger, ce genre d'infos est à prendre au cas par cas !!!
Les "japonaises" ont toujours eut un cran technologique d'avance par rapport aux européennes et américaines en terme de tribologie. Je ne serai pas étonné qu'ils aient déjà implémenté ce qu'il fallait pour être "tout carburants", comme certains moteurs militaires... (chars, camions, etc.... )
Un membre de ma famille était ingé moteur au GIAT. Il y a plus de 20 ans déjà, leurs moteurs en développement fonctionnaient à tout ce qui était inflammable !!!.... Seul le rendement variait, mais sans dommages...

Mon dernier plein c'est fait au E10 et comme précédemment, cela fonctionne mais je n'en ferai pas mon usage quotidien clin D'ailleurs, inutile de prendre ce genre de risque, nos moulins étant suffisamment "sensibles" aux pépins. JM Méca, (indépendant Porsche) largement présent sur FB, à un avis bien tranché sur la question.
avatar
Gillou91
Le disciple du Sage
Le disciple du Sage

Age : 61

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par Sylkill le Ven 9 Fév - 11:27:56

Le problème de l'éthanol, qui peut être considéré comme un avantage selon la position qu'on adopte, c'est que c'est un anti-déflagrant et un alcool. Indice d'octane 120 si ma mémoire est bonne. On peut donc faire monter le taux de compression d'un moteur sans risque.... mais c'est aussi un carburant qui contient déjà un groupement -OH (le groupement alcool justement), et ça apporte naturellement de l'oxygène à la combustion. Pour avoir le bon rapport stoechiométrique, ça nécessite d'injecter plus de carburant (ou moins d'air), d'où la surconsommation constatée généralement.
Pour une conversion à l'éthanol pur, ça demande généralement de mettre des injecteurs à plus gros débit et une carto adaptée. L'ordre d'idée c'est un rapport 1 pour l'essence et 1.8 pour l'éthanol. C'est pour ça aussi qu'on retrouve une petite baisse de puissance sur les moteurs qui ne sont pas prévus pour, car les injecteurs ne peuvent pas suivre le débit maximal. Sinon à cylindrée égale un moteur fonctionnant à l'éthanol va pouvoir sortir plus de puissance qu'à l'essence... mais il va aussi chauffer plus car le rendement de la combustion reste le même.
Dernier aspect : l'alcool est détergent et peut attaquer les joints qui n'ont pas été prévus pour. Risques de fuites sur les durits, les pompes, les injecteurs.
avatar
Sylkill
8000 tr/mn
8000 tr/mn


http://996 Carrera 3.4L

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par Gillou91 le Dim 11 Fév - 0:32:01

Très bon complément d'informations, MERCI Sylvain !!! clin

La non compatibilité des élastomères avec les fluides est effectivement un des modes de défaillance bien connu. J'ai encore en souvenir un pistolet à peinture que j'avais prêté à un ami. Après son usage, il n'a pas trouvé mieux que de faire tremper l'ensemble dans de l'essence automobile.... Tous les joints ont doublés de volume... Tous foutus !!!
avatar
Gillou91
Le disciple du Sage
Le disciple du Sage

Age : 61

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures dis nous tout sur les "Hot oints"

Message par yasby le Sam 12 Mai - 23:49:15

@Gillou91 a écrit:Bah.... les gars, perso cela ne me dérange pas du tout que ces gens là fassent "leur show" pour replacer leurs affaires. Ce ne sont pas des fonctionnaires, il faut bien qu'ils vendent pour que l'argent rentre !!!
La R§D pour certains concepts n'est pas gratuite.... Eux ne sont pas au CNRS, avec des budgets annuels à dépenser... 

Perso, je trouve leurs exposés intéressants car bien des gens (futurs acheteurs de grenouilles) n'y connaissent absolument rien sur les faiblesses de ces moteurs. L'acheteur de mon ex, je l'ai "formé" au moment de la vente, avec tout un listing des "hot points" à surveiller, avant qu'il ne soit trop tard !!!
Tous les futurs acheteurs ne sont pas sur des forums, et encore moins connaissent "la mécanique"... 

Ayant une expérience d'~ 40 années de conceptions mécaniques industrielles "pointues" sur uniquement des prototypes dans une industrie "high tech", concevoir/valider de nouveaux concepts pour des clients en réinventant à chaque fois "l'eau chaude", je peux vous certifier que la critique est facile mais que l'Art est difficile !!! On gagnait en efficacité, mais chaque nouveau concept apportait son lot d'emmerdes à déverminer !!!

Comme le mentionne Louis, les 3 ténors en moteurs de 911 sont bien Harterck, JM Méca et LN Engineering (Il y en a certainement d'autres....) avec des solutions correctives aux défauts de ces moteurs. Ces gens là doivent bien faire leurs pubs, comme pour de la lessive, afin de gagner leur vie !!! Sans marketing, point de vente, c'est bien connu !!!
A chacun de faire son choix, selon ses convictions.... 

A titre personnel, j'ai les miennes, grâce à mon expérience de certaines utilisations et méthodes industrielles, transposables dans nos moteurs... C'est justement pour cela qu'à un moment, je cherchais une 997 avec un moteur cassé.... Hélas pour moi à ce moment là, celle que j'avais trouvé, son vendeur en voulais bien trop cher....
avatar
yasby
3000 tr/m
3000 tr/m


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

GMT + 8 Heures Re: Informations techniques

Message par Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Page 2 sur 2 Précédent  1, 2

Revenir en haut


 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum